Urbex: AEI Cable Works

urbex

My urbex career has peaked….way too early!

The AEI Cable works doesn’t have much left standing apart from this solitary building but this isn’t what we came here for.

Henley/AEI Cable Works

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Henley Cable Factory

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Finding something underground has been on the list since I started exploring. This specific trip was one of the most difficult entries with all of the main entrances being welded shut.

Sealed Tight

Welded Shut

The shelter was built for the Henley/AEI Cable work employees and to avoid confusion there were six separate entrances with clearly marked corridors to keep track of everyone and help employees find their way during a raid.

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Navigation

Toilet break?
Toilet Break

<-- First aid this way

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A lone man's terror

The shelter was pitch black so playing around with torches was fun to expose the photos.
These were all taken in-camera using different torches/lights and only small elements of cropping to achieve the final result.

Keep this side clear.

Tunnel 4

Ground Level

G4

Tunnel 4

Playing with torches.

Pathway..

The Looming Shadow

Fun with bike lights.

Whisps.

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Urbex: RNTR Arrochar

History, Uncategorized

RNTR Arroachar was a torpedo testing centre opened in 1912 with the bulk of its activity occurring during WWII when approximately 12,565 torpedoes were launched into loch long.

Arrochar torpedo base

The centre did not test ‘live’ rounds and was used solely to test the range of torpedos. Seven recovery boats were in action each day to recover the torpedos launched into the loch. Working torpedos were then transported to RNAD Coulport for war heading.

Arrochar torpedo base

Arrochar torpedo base

Submarines would often be pulled up alongside the jetty to conduct Discharge Weapon System Trials. RNTR Arroachar supplied torpedos required for the Submarine Commanders’ Course, on these days over 40 torpedos would be fired into the loch.

Arrochar torpedo base

For more history and some great archive photos see here.

Want more urbex – see my adventures in Urbex: AEI Cable Works.

Fun with Puffins (Lunga – July 2017)

landscape, Nature, photography, Travel, Uncategorized

Puffins spend more time at sea than on land. Most of the year a puffin lives out on the ocean, only returning during mating season. During this time Male and female puffins share the responsibility of building a nest for the safekeeping of their eggs.

Making a next

Puffins breed in burrows often making use of rabbit burrows to avoid having to dig one for their own use.

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A puffins beak is only coloured orange during mating season. For the rest of the year the puffins beak is a dull grey colour.

Grooming

Facing the wind

A baby puffin is called a ‘puffling’. A mother calls for her puffling below, on land Puffins are very talkative however at sea, where they spend most of their time, they are silent.

Searching for her Puffling

An average puffin weighs about the same as a can of Coke.

Puffin portrait


I’d highly recommend a trip to Lunga off the west coast of Scotland as a great way to visit these animals and explore all of the wildlife this part of the world has to offer!

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Crypt of St Leonards, Hythe

architecture, art, B&W, History, photography, Travel, Uncategorized

The crypt at St Leonard’s is a very mysterious place, over 2,000 skulls on display either shelved or as part of a giant pile of skulls and thigh bones. No-one has been able to confirm exactly when the bones were first displayed in this manner of even why. However, what is known from recorded history is that the skulls have been on show for at least the last 400 years!

A bird nesting in one of the skulls. Luckily after death!
Nesting

This pile is made up of around 1,000 skulls and 8,000 thigh bones. Theory suggests that the bones were put on display to travelling Pilgrims from the close proximity to the port town of Dover. A macabre shrine / tourist attraction on the way to Cantebury.
Pile of bones

This poor fellow died of a sword wound; interestingly you can see how the skull has tried to heal leading to the growth in the around the wound.
Sword wound!

Some of these skulls are over 700 years old. It has been assumed that these were mostly found in unmarked graves from the church graveyard, which due to space restrictions did not have gravestones. It was a common occurrence to find skeletons whilst digging a new grave. Why not put it on display?!
Over 700 years old!

A example of a bone tumour – not necessarily the cause of death.
Bone Tumour

Skulls

It’s a good job the rest of the church isn’t so dreary!
St Leonards, Hythe

Credit to Jack F Barker for producing a guidebook explaining the small amount that is actually known about the crypt.

As one of only two ossuaries in the UK I highly recommend a visit: http://www.stleonardschurchhythekent.org/thecrypt.html.

 

How tall was Hercules? -Amman Citadel

architecture, art, History, landscape, photography, Ruins, Temple, Travel

The ruins of this temple in the Amman citadel complex once held a statute of the hero of Greek mythology, Hercules. Built between 162-166 CE scientists have not been able to accurately determine how tall he actually was!

Best guess?

The temple of Hercules

The temple of Hercules

The temple of Hercules

The Temple of Hercules

The road to Umayyad Palace

The road to Umayyad Palace

Jerash – Greek or Roman?

architecture, art, History, landscape, photography, Ruins, Temple, Travel

Sunset over the Temple of Artemis

Name drop ‘Alexander the great’ founded this place; as an ancient greek city you’d think you were in Athens rather than 30 miles north of the modern day capital of Jordan.

Pillars

The main street

Jerash thrived during the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods which is evidenced by the expansive ruins which remain. Despite the 749 Galilee earthquake destroying large parts of Jerash a significant portion of the site remains.

What remains of the old market place.The Marketplace

The Jerash nymphaeum.The Jerash nymphaeum.

The temple of Artemis
Artemis is known as the hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women! Built in CE 150 this was once the most important temple of Jerash but was later turned into a fortress and mostly destroyed by a great fire.
Temple of Artemis

Petra- Searching for the Holy Grail

architecture, History, landscape, photography, Ruins, Temple, Travel

Petra has to be visited to be truly appreciated. One of the new seven wonders of the world and it really deserves its place. The complex named Petra is vast and has so much to explore; after spending over 6 hours and walking somewhere in the region of 30km there was still so much to see.

Al Khazneh or The Treasury 

Originally built as a mausoleum and crypt at the beginning of the 1st century AD. Its Arabic name Treasury derives from one legend that bandits or pirates hid their loot in a stone urn high on the second level.

Emerging through the Siq.

Al Khazneh (The Treasury)

Visiting the Treasury at night is a captivating experience; a candle lit walk through the Siq leads you to the base of the structure softly illuminated by hundreds of small candle lit lamps. This is the only time I saw more than a handful of tourists in one place!

The Treasury at Night

The Royal Tombs (incl The Palace Tomb)

A stretch of tombs and burial chambers line the North eastern edge of Petra.

The Palace Tomb

Inside the tomb.

Tomb Entrance

Exit the tomb.

Hopefully this may give an impression of the scale of the city of Petra; this is just one small part.

The Royal Tombs at Petra

Ad Deir or The Monastery

Built by the Nabataeans in the 1st century and measuring 50 metres (160 ft) wide by approximately 45 metres (148 ft) high.

Petra postcard

The climb to reach this ruin snakes up the mountainside covering somewhere close to 900 steps. After avoiding the numerous Bedouins trying to rip-off the tourists selling trinkets and donkey rides you turn a corner to witness this tremendous site.

The Monastery (Ad Deir)

Stone tower

Ad Deir

Other sights..
The Nymphaeum

Petra Amphitheatre

Down Street: Churchill’s Secret Tube

architecture, B&W, History, Travel

Down Street was once part of the Great Northern, Piccadilly & Brompton Railway (now known as the Piccadilly line) and stood between Hyde Park Corner and Green Park. After these two stations expanded its use as a tube station became redundant and it was closed in 1932.

It became active again in 1938 during the build up to WWII, the Railway Executive Committee (REC) used it as a bomb proof HQ to house 40 staff during air raids and bombings over London.

There’s only one entrance/exit to the outside, not great in case of fire.

Signage to the street

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Ventilation was key, especially so Churchill and other execs could smoke in the underground HQ!

Ventilation shafts in Down Street

Down Street tube station

Old signage showing the direction of the trains

To Finsbury Park

A fully functional kitchen used to serve caviar during the war! Not much left now.
The kitchen @ Down Street

The platforms were turned in to corridors as part of the REC HQ, doesn’t look much like a tube station anymore.

The platform.

Interesting the REC architects decided to paint over the original tile works, apparently the “yellow paint” made it more homely for those working 12 hour shifts underground.

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London Brutalism: A study in concrete

architecture, art, B&W, History

Many people think its an eyesore, others love the geometry. Brutalism is a form of architecture that started in the mid-1950s characterised by its raw concrete exterior and repeated modular elements forming a unified structure.

One of the most famous examples is the Barbican development.

Descend

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Another prime example of this style can be found along the Southbank, the sprawling complex of the National Theatre and Southbank Centre.

Brutalism London

London Brutalism

London Brutalism

Brutalism London

Famed for being one of the most hideous examples and also now left to rot after being found full asbestos. Robin Hood Gardens.

Brutalism London

Brutalism London

Brutalism London

Abbeyfield Road, Bermondsey.

Brutalism London
Brutalism London

Adventures in Ukraine: What’s left behind.

Uncategorized

Its impressive just how much stuff has been looted from Pripyat over the last 30 years. Especially given the level of radiation and the fact that residents must have left most of their possessions as they were unaware they were not ever returning.

The buildings are littered with all sorts of items left behind after the evacuation.

The hospital

The supplies left behind.

Sterile...No survivors

Scraps of machinery and old mail systems litter a soviet surveillance factory.

Machinery

The vents.

Forgotten memories in a child’s bedroom

Forgotten memories

 

Adventures in Ukraine: Pripyat.

History, landscape, Ruins, Travel, urbex

Pripyat was home to around 50,000 residents when the Chernobyl reactor exploded on the 26 April 1986 causing radiation levels in the town to skyrocket to 200,000 times normal. The evacuation order wasn’t given until 14:00 on 27 April 1986 leaving the residents exposed to deadly levels of radiation. Told to pack for 3 days the residents had no idea they would never be returning….

What is now left of the town is an urban exploration dream; a whole town abandoned and left to rot. All that is needed is a permit from the Ukrainian government and you’re in. Current day radiation levels are fairly safe in most parts of the town not exposing you to any higher levels of radiation than you would receive on a transatlantic flight.

I spent two days on a guided tour where we were shown the highlights and given freedom to explore all sorts of parts of the town.

We weren’t officially supposed to be up here; a 15 minute pit stop gave us enough time to sprint to the roof of the hotel in Pripyat town square.

Hotel

Pripyat town square

The boatyardJunk boatyard

The funfare
Fun at the fare!

Vehicle junkyard

School bus

Fire truck

The recreation centre; amazingly the stained glass hasn’t been broken.Recreation centre

Recreation centre

The hospital waiting room.The hospital waiting room.

Time to take your seat..Take you seat...

Out of tune.A little out of tune.

Conference centreConference Centre

One of many abandoned apartment blocks. These places have been totally looted. Its crazy considering the amount of possessions that would have been left behind after being told you were only going to be gone 3 days

Abandoned soviet aparment

View over Pripyat to Chernobyl

View to Chernobyl

Public Swimming poolThe council need to clean this up...

Schools out for…..ever!

Schools out for...winter..

Time for sports.Gym practice

Cooling tower.Eye in the sky